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Proposed Senior Citizen Legislation

June 25, 2019 | 0 Comments

PROPOSED LEGISLATION

PROPOSED BY THE ARKANSAS VETERANS NETWORK, INC.

For An Act To Be Entitled

The Fred Potter Senior Citizen Financial Protection Act

An act to protect senior citizens from financial harm due to civil adjudication in all courts and venues in the State of Arkansas.

 BE IT ENACTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF ARKANSAS:

SECTION 1.  EXEMPTIONS IN CLAIMS AND IN COURT ADJUDICATION

  • No person and/or citizen of the State of Arkansas shall lose control of personal property as the result of civil litigation and any judicial order in the State of Arkansas.
  • Personal property exemptions to adjudication shall include, but not be limited to clothing, personal documents, photos, family heirlooms, medical equipment, and limited transportation for personal use to attend employment and/or medical appointments.

 SECTION 2.  EVIDENCE

  • All evidence in a civil lawsuit where a senior citizen is a party to and through submission of discovery and/or testimony of property shall be substantial in nature and shall not rely solely on testimony that said property does exist.
  • All courts in and for the State of Arkansas must stay all civil proceedings, court orders, and final adjudications in the event of any evidence presented to the court at any time that can or will alter any adjudication and/or any court orders.
  • All courts in and for the State of Arkansas must take judicial notice of any investigation, conclusions, and rulings of any and all investigations by any agency or department of the United States government that has an interest and potential effect in any civil litigation filed in the courts of the State of Arkansas. In the event of the preceding Arkansas courts shall be governed by SECTION 2 (B) of this act.

 SECTION 3. RESTRICTIONS

  • No court of the State of Arkansas shall impose any excessive fine to a senior citizen that results in the definition of a debtor’s prison that was deemed unconstitutional by The United States Supreme Court in 1834.
  • No court of the State of Arkansas shall impose incarceration and/or lost of liberty to a senior citizen

 SECTION 4. LEGISLATIVE INTENT.

It is the intent of the General Assembly that all senior citizens over the age of 60 years shall enjoy their financial resources and the protection thereof without any coercion by any party to a power of attorney, trust, executor, civil litigation or any state court in the State of Arkansas.

 SECTION 5. EFFECTIVE DATE. This act is effective on and after (DATED).

“IF YOU DON’T STAND FOR OUR SENIOR CITIZENS THEN YOU DON’T DESERVE OUR VOTE”

Sign The Petition

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

https://arkansasveteransnetwork.org

https://justiceforfredpotter.com

Arkansas Veterans Network, Inc.

How a Bill Becomes a Law in Arkansas

A concerned citizen contacts his/her Senator or Representative.
• After a bill is drafted, it can be introduced by any member of the House or Senate. More than one legislator can sponsor a bill. The bill is filed with the Bill Clerk, who assigns the bill a number.
• The bill is then introduced and read in the House or the Senate for the first and usually a second time (a bill must be read three times before final passage).
• After reading, the bill is assigned to the appropriate Committee.
• The Committee schedules the bill to be read at a public meeting where legislators and anyone interested can speak for or against the bill. The committee can also add amendments to a bill.
• The committee then votes on the bill.  The committee can vote one of four ways: do pass, do pass as amended, do not pass, or without recommendation.
• If a bill is amended, the bill is engrossed to include the amendment.
• When a bill comes out of committee, it is placed on the calendar for a third reading. At the third reading, the Reading clerk reads the title of the bill for the third and final time.
• Vote: Most bills are adopted by a simple majority. Appropriation bills require a
3/4 vote. Initiated acts may be amended or repealed by a 2/3 vote of both houses.
• If the Bill fails, it dies on the floor.
• If the bill passes, it is sent to the opposite chamber and repeats the process that it followed in the previous chamber.
• When bills are passed by both houses, the enrolled bill is certified by the presiding officer of each house and sent to the Governor.
• The Governor must sign, veto, or refer the bill back to its house of origin with his objections within 5 days. The bill may be passed over the Governor’s veto by a simple majority vote of both houses. A bill not signed or returned within 5 days of session must be signed or vetoed by the Governor within 20 days of adjournment of the general assembly or it becomes law without his signature.
•All acts are given a number and filed with the Secretary of State.